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236 | Gb Relative Modes - Guitar Chords
Permutations to expand your songwriting palette
September 22, 2023
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Earlier posts in this series look at how to form and play different permutations (or "modes") of a key.

These principles apply to any key, including the key of Gb (a.k.a., F#), as we'll explore here. When you take the 7 notes of the Gb major scale -- Gb, Ab, Bb, Cb, Db, Eb, F, Gb -- you create 7 modes starting on each respective note.

Each pattern is a distinct sound because each mode begins and ends on a different note (or "tonic"). In this example, the tonic of Gb Ionian is Gb ... while the tonic of Ab Dorian is Ab ... and so on.

Each sequence of notes sounds nice. But they sound especially good when played as chords -- like these chords of Gb Ionian (a.k.a., Gb major):

The Gb Ionian mode sounds good fleshed out as harmonies because it's really just the major scale pattern. And just like the notes, these same 7 chords can also be arranged into 7 permutations -- like these three patterns, for example:

And the same idea applies to all of the other chords in this key, as you can see here....

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269 | Lesson 19 - Quick Update

Hey there. I worked on Lesson 19 (Circle of Fifths) all day yesterday. Here's a short update that we filmed last night. Enjoy!

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264 | Lesson 18 Update
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November 26, 2023
On the Topic of Holiday Discounts

Hello! 'Tis the season for this message:

00:00:53

Hey @MikeGeorge ,

Thanks a ton for all of your content. I can feel myself making sense of things I’ve been trying to grasp for a long time adding bits and pieces I found on the internet. I started electronic music on a DAW and thought music theory was too complex so I spent years trying things out randomly and sometimes discovering a theory concept on the way. I recently discovered you approach to theory and it really clicked for me. I can feel my musical confidence rising using ColorMusic and I start to have a glimpse at the freedom I could have following your method. This feels truly amazing and immensely motivating!:)

I’m currently trying to analyse songs I love through your method. I’ve looked around your website trying to find a PDF that would gather all the diagrams related to their specific keys and scales. It might not exist (yet). I’ve made a draft of it to show you what I mean

The example is a mesh of different scales because I couldn’t find all the diagrams for a ...

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@MikeGeorge can you please send me pdfs to illustrate all the keys with notes and chords as well as modes with all notes and chords?

Hey George I’ve just about watched every single YouTube video of yours and purchased the guitar and piano labels and wheel as the chord map. I want to print out some of the PDFs but everything isn’t so clearly organized. Can you please send me the pdfs where I can see every single key and the notes and chords that are in each key as well as every single mode and the notes and key in them?

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290 | The Andalusian Cadence

In music, there's a special chord progression called the "Andalusian Cadence." You've heard it before -- because it's used in many classic tunes. Here we look at this pattern to see why it sounds so good. And we explore different ways to tweak it to compose some other cool progressions....

Here are the diagrams for you to explore:

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Open Hour Q&A - Saturday, June 15

Hey -- We're hanging out via live stream Saturday, June 8 at 9:00 a.m. Mountain. (Ask any questions Live or post them on Locals in advance.) This Open Hour is for supporters. THANK YOU!

Here's the link to join:

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289 | Using Modes to Write Songs

Modes are your secret weapon as a songwriter -- because they take a plain chord progression and make it better. And there are different ways you can do this, as we explore using a couple of song examples....

Here are the chord progressions in Del Shannon's song "Runaway" for you to explore at your own pace:

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