ColorMusic
Art • Music • Education
179 | G Relative Modes - Guitar Chords
Permutations to expand your songwriting palette
January 03, 2023
post photo preview

In an earlier post (#173), you can see how the C major scale forms a variety of permutations or "relative modes." Each permutation (or "mode") is related to the others since they all stem from the same source scale -- hence the name "relative modes."

And what's cool is that this same principle applies to all keys, not just C. For example, when you take the 7 notes of the G major scale -- G, A, B, C, D, E, F#, G -- you likewise come up with 7 modes starting on each respective note.

Because each mode begins and ends on a different note (or "tonic") of the mode, each pattern is a distinct sound. In this example, the tonic of G Ionian is G ... while the tonic of A Dorian is A ... and so on.

When played simply as a sequence of notes, each pattern sounds nice. But these same modal patterns can also be played as chords. For example, if you focus on the G major scale (a.k.a., G Ionian, or the first mode) and play it as chords, this is what you get:

The G Ionian mode sounds good fleshed out as harmonies like this because it's really just the major scale pattern on steriods.

And just like the notes, these same 7 chords can also be arranged into 7 permutations -- like these three patterns, for example:

And, as you would expect, the same idea applies to all of the other chords in this key, as shown here....

Only for Supporters
To read the rest of this article and access other paid content, you must be a supporter
2
What else you may like…
Videos
Posts
Articles
Live Streamed on May 28, 2023 1:02 PM ET
216 | Introducing the ChordMap

Hello there.

01:08:05
Live Streamed on May 17, 2023 8:37 PM ET
212 | The NEW Website

Introducing the new site.
https://www.mycolormusic.com/

00:09:40
Live Streamed on May 7, 2023 11:39 AM ET
211 | Updates Live Stream

Hey there.

00:49:14
No Live Stream Tonight

Heads up -- I will not be streaming on YouTube tonight as previously planned. As you know, my studio involves a lot of equipment, and I need to do a couple of things to make sure I can go live over there as here on Locals.

I'll post an update here when that live stream is scheduled. 🤘

ChordMap Live Stream - Sunday

Hey! Join me for a live stream today (Sunday, May 28) @ 5:00 p.m., UTC. We will:
-- take a look at the new ChordMap
-- explore how to navigate the circle of fifths
-- and walk through a great song example using this tool

See you then!

You can get your ChordMap here: https://shop.mycolormusic.com/products/colormusic-chordmap-circle-of-fifths-tool

post photo preview

Hi! Can I find somewhere a pdf with the mega pattern with circle of fifths and circle of thirds above each note?

post photo preview
219 | B Relative Modes - Guitar Chords
Permutations to expand your songwriting palette

Earlier posts look at how to form and play different permutations (or "modes") of a key.

These principles apply to any key, including the key of B, as we'll explore here. When you take the 7 notes of the B major scale -- B, C#, D#, E, F#, G#, A#, B -- you create 7 modes starting on each respective note.

Each pattern is a distinct sound because each mode begins and ends on a different note (or "tonic"). In this example, the tonic of B Ionian is B ... while the tonic of C# Dorian is C# ... and so on.

Each sequence of notes sounds nice. But they sound especially good when played as chords -- like these chords of B Ionian (a.k.a., B major):The B Ionian mode sounds good fleshed out as harmonies because it's really just the major scale pattern. And just like the notes, these same 7 chords can also be arranged into 7 permutations -- like these three patterns, for example:

And the same idea applies to all of the other chords in this key, as you can see here....

Only for Supporters
To read the rest of this article and access other paid content, you must be a supporter
Read full Article
post photo preview
218 | Key of E - Chord Inversions (Guitar)
finger positions on the fretboard

Here's how to play all 7 chords in the key of E -- in any position on the fretboard.

Each harmony is formed from the underlying scale of the key. In this case, the E major scale:

And on the guitar, all of these chords follow a predictable (CAGED chord shape) pattern up the fretboard....

Only for Supporters
To read the rest of this article and access other paid content, you must be a supporter
Read full Article
post photo preview
217 | ChordMap Quick Start
how to navigate the map

Here's a quick intro to navigating your ChordMap™ -- to crack the code to songwriting. With it, you can identify the key, mode, and chord progressions in a song. Here’s how it works:

Parallel Modes

In the circle of fifths, the chords in each key are grouped. Parallel modes (which share the same tonic) are all neighbors in the circle of fifths. These parallel modes are a common source of borrowed chords in songs. Using the key of C, for example:

  • Rotate the numerals layer to align “I” next to C (the red square in the inner ring). This will also position all of the other numerals with their respective chords.

  • Holding the numeral layer in place, next rotate the grouping line layer to point at the “Lydian” label. This layer arrangement highlights the chords of C LYDIAN, which includes C major, D major, E minor, F# diminished, G major, A minor, and B minor – marked by numerals I, II, iii, #iv°, V, vi, and vii, respectively:

  • Continuing to hold the numerals layer in place, you can then rotate the grouping line layer counterclockwise in 30-degree increments. This highlights the other C parallel modes, including C IONIAN (a.k.a. “C major”) with chords C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor, and B diminished – marked by numerals, I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, and vii°:

  • C MIXOLYDIAN with chords C major, D minor, E diminished, F major, G minor, A minor, and Bb major, marked by numerals I, ii, iii°, IV, v, vi, and bVII, respectively:

  • C DORIAN with chords chords C minor, D minor, Eb major, F major, G minor, A diminished, and Bb major, marked by numerals i, ii, bIII, IV, v, vi°, and bVII, respectively:

  • C AEOLIAN (a.k.a. “C minor”) with chords C minor, D diminished, Eb major, F minor, G minor, Ab major, and Bb major, marked by numerals i, ii°, bIII, iv, v, bVI, and bVII, respectively:

  • C PHRYGIAN with chords C minor, Db major, Eb major, F minor, G diminished, Ab major, and Bb minor, marked by numerals i, bII, bIII, iv, v°, bVI, and bvii, respectively:

  • And finally, C LOCRIAN with chords C diminished, Db major, Eb minor, F minor, Gb major, Ab major, and Bb minor, marked by numerals i°, bII, biii, iv, bV, bVI, and bvii, respectively:

Again, by holding the numerals layer in place and rotating the grouping line counterclockwise, you can see each parallel mode – as this image summarizes:

Relative Modes

The ChordMap also illustrates all relative modes in every key, but moving in reverse. You do this by holding the grouping line layer in place instead and rotating the numerals layer. Using the key of C again, for example:

  • Rotate the numerals layer to align “I” next to C (the red square in the inner ring). As before, this will position all the other numerals with their respective chords.

  • Next, position the grouping line layer so that it is pointing directly up to the “Ionian” label. This again highlights the C IONIAN mode (a.k.a. “C major”) with chords C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor, and B diminished – marked by numerals, I, ii, iii, IV, V, vi, and vii°:

  • Holding the grouping line layer in place, rotate the numerals layer 30-degrees in a counterclockwise direction to highlights the chords of F LYDIAN, which includes F major, G major, A minor, B diminished, C major, D minor, and E minor – marked by numerals I, II, iii, #iv°, V, vi, and vii, respectively:

  • Again keeping the grouping line in place and rotating the numerals 30-degrees clockwise past C Ionian, the G MIXOLYDIAN mode is illustrated, with chords G major, A minor, B diminished, C major, D minor, E minor, and F major – marked by numerals I, ii, iii°, IV, v, vi, and bVII, respectively: 

  • Rotating the numerals further clockwise by 30-degrees, the stationary group line highlights the D DORIAN mode, with D minor, E minor, F major, G major, A minor, B diminished, and C major, marked by numerals i, ii, bIII, IV, v, vi°, and bVII, respectively:

  • Another clockwise rotation of the numerals by 30-degrees highlights the A AEOLIAN mode, which includes chords A minor, B diminished, C major, D minor, E minor, F major, and G major, marked by numerals i, ii°, bIII, iv, v, bVI, and bVII, respectively:

  • Yet another 30-degree clockwise rotation of the numerals in relation to the stationary group line highlights E PHRYGIAN, which includes chords E minor, F major, G major, A minor, B diminished, C major, and D minor, marked by numerals i, bII, bIII, iv, v°, bVI, and bvii, respectively:

  • Finally, one more 30-degree clockwise rotation of the numerals highlights the B LOCRIAN mode, with chords B diminished, C major, D minor, E minor, F major, G major, and A minor, marked by numerals i°, bII, biii, iv, bV, bVI, and bvii, respectively:

To summarize, these are the seven relative modes of C major:

 

Parallel vs. Relative Modes

Because each layer of the ChordMap can move independently, these same relationships are shown in all 12 keys – whether the numerals remain stationary and the grouping line rotates to illustrate PARALLEL modes … or vice versa, with the grouping line made stationary and the numerals rotated in 30-degree increments to highlight RELATIVE modes. 

In the examples above, each PARALLEL mode of C is shown to be a permutation of seven other keys:

  • C Lydian = G Ionian

  • C Ionian = C Ionian

  • C Mixolydian = F Ionian

  • C Dorian = Bb Ionian

  • C Aeolian = Eb Ionian

  • C Phrygian = Ab Ionian

  • C Locrian = Db Ionian 

In contrast, each RELATIVE mode C is a permutation of the key of C:

  • F Lydian = C Ionian

  • C Ionian = C Ionian

  • G Mixolydian = C Ionian

  • D Dorian = C Ionian

  • A Aeolian = C Ionian

  • E Phrygian = C Ionian

  • B Locrian = C Ionian 

Again, these relationships are cyclical and symmetrical so you can quickly navigate the circle of fifths. Once you know how to move around the ChordMap, it’s easy to analyze chord progressions, including:

  • the use of parallel modes for borrowed chords

  • the use of both parallel and relative modes for modal mixture

  • the use of modulation (shifting between modes within a composition)

  • etc.

There’s so much to explore. Enjoy!

Read full Article
See More
Available on mobile and TV devices
google store google store app store app store
google store google store app tv store app tv store amazon store amazon store roku store roku store
Powered by Locals